Nursing care of the unconscious patient.
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Nursing care of the unconscious patient. [By] Pamela Mountjoy and Barbara Wythe. Foreword by Denis Williams. by Pamela Mountjoy

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Published by Bailliére, Tindall & Cassel in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Practical nursing

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsWythe, Barbara,
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRT62 M68
The Physical Object
Pagination97p.
Number of Pages97
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18631497M

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Making decisions based on prejudices can have devastating impacts on nursing care. The first step in addressing the impact of unconscious bias is identifying your own biases. Arvizo C, Garrison E. Diversity and inclusion: the role of unconscious bias on patient care, health outcomes and the workforce in obstetrics and gynaecology. Curr Opin. Unconscious patients have no control over themselves or their environment and thus are highly dependent on the nurse. The skills required to care for unconscious patients are not specific to critical care and theatres as unconscious patients are nursed in a variety of clinical settings. Nursing such patients can be a source of anxiety for nurses. Unconscious patients are nursed in a variety of clinical settings and therefore it is necessary for all nurses to assess, plan and implement the nursing care of this vulnerable patient group. This article discusses the nursing management of patients who are unconscious and examines the priorities of patient care. nurse play and important role in the care of unconscious (comtosed) patient to prevent p otential complications respiratory eg;distress, pneumonia,a spiration,p ressure achived by: 1. Maintaining patent airway. Elevating the head end of the bed to degree prevents aspiration.

A patient who is initially observed to be unconscious can ultimately manifest a variety of clinical states. Some patients will regain full consciousness without intervention, while others will require intensive management and intricate diagnostic testing. Etiologies of persistent unconsciousness can be .   CARE OF UNCONCIOUS PATIENTS 1. CARE OF UNCONSCIOUS PATIENT Hillary Lubuto BSc NRS 4th Year,RN DNS-SOM-UNZA 09/19/13 1KABWE SCHOOL OF NURSING AND MIDWIFERY 2. INTRODUCTION Managing of the critically ill/ unconscious patient can be a challenging experience and it requires a collaborative approach. Nursing care of the unconscious patient, Paperback – January 1, by Pamela Mountjoy (Author) › Visit Amazon's Pamela Mountjoy Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central Cited by: 1.   Unconscious patients are nursed in a variety of clinical settings and therefore it is necessary for all nurses to assess, plan and implement the nursing care of this vulnerable patient group.

Published in the October issue of Today’s Hospitalist. MOST OF US pride ourselves on being able to recognize explicit bias when we see it, whether it is overt racism, homophobia, ageism or sexism. But the reality is that our unconscious biases—tied to many of those same issues and more, including people’s weight, socioeconomic status and physical disabilities—can make spotting. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mountjoy, Pamela. Nursing care of the unconscious patient. London, Bailliere, Tindall & Cassell,   I have a dieing, unconcious, comfort care patient. The family has just DC peg tube feedings. She has a fever, she is on morphine via peg tube. We are gradually decreasing o2 via nasal cannula. I am having a difficult time picking 3 nursing diagnosis for this patient. I .   The Glasgow Coma Scale uses three areas of patient response to determine a score that indicates coma level: these are eye opening, speech and best motor response. The highest score (the alert patient) is 15 and the lowest (in deep coma or dead) is 3.